Four Survival Uses for Paraffin Wax

Four Survival Uses for Paraffin WaxParaffin wax is a white or colorless soft solid derivable from petroleum, coal, or oil shale. The wax is solid at room temperature and begins to melt at around 99 °F (37° C). Its boiling point is plus or minus 698 °F.

The wax was first created in the 1850’s and it wasn’t long after that it began to replace tallow candles and whale oil as lighting for homes. People found that paraffin candles burned much more cleanly than tallow ones, and the wax was readily available and easy to work with. The most common applications for paraffin wax include lubrication, electrical insulation, and candle making.

Survival Uses

One of the properties of paraffin wax is its ability to absorb heat and then release that heat. Wax can be modified for use in building materials such as drywall. The drywall is infused with wax and during the heat of the day the wax absorbs the heat and expands, (wax expands as it is heated) and when night falls the wax cools, and then

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Medical Emergency Care

Medical Emergency Care

Every family or survival group needs a medic, and at any point in time, he or she could encounter a life-threatening medical emergency. In normal times, the goal is to get emergency services on the scene and the victim to a modern medical facility as quickly as possible. When bother hits, however, the family medic becomes the end of the line and must act quickly to stop a tragedy.

The classic example of a medical emergency would be when a person collapses. This can happen for various reasons, including life-threatening cardiac events like heart attacks, airway obstructions that prevent air passage, head trauma and even simple fainting episodes.

CARDIAC EVENTS

A heart attack is caused by a blockage in blood flow to a portion of the heart. It’s also known as a “myocardial infarction.” A heart attack may be mild or severe, depending on the amount of heart muscle that loses oxygenation. Common symptoms are chest, left arm and jaw pain or tightness, along with shortness of breath and light headedness.

What To Do: Immediately have the victim chew an adult aspirin or four baby aspirins, as well as any cardiac medications like nitroglycerin that they could have stockpiled…

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